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We Hate Comics Sans

Why the font that is loved by teenagers is strongly resisted among designers

I’m sure you have noticed. Among designers and creative people there is an aversion to a font that since the explosion of the computer age has been known as Comic Sans. This clearly is for a reason. And though I’m not claiming to know the inner workings of the minds of all graphic designers, from an objective perspective I can elaborate on some theories about such ingrained discontent.

Comic Sans represents zero composition, a disorganized structure and general dishevelment. In short, using it is like asking someone to make bulletin boards by hand. Oh! And in terms of the person using the font, it’s clear that in addition to never having done any calligraphy exercises, they do not have an artistic vision and not even pretty handwriting. This is why the rancor among designers exists.

I challenge you on your next walk around the neighborhood to count the times you identify this font on signs, posters, flyers; or on your phone in the images that your aunt sends you every morning to wish you good morning.

Comic Sans has an intrinsic childish aspect in its structure, which takes it further away from its use by designers. In connoted cases and for specific purposes its use is acceptable, but the communicative effects of its use are still questionable. Although, it still could never be associated with effectiveness because of its disheveled form, especially while playing with the odds of marketing a highly positioned and successful a product.

The main reason for its popularity is because it represents the easiest way out. The first thing that anyone learns when they discover that they can change the appearance of an electronic document is to “randomly” choose Comic Sans. Why? Because it stands out among many other sources that text processors offer, and this is not exactly a good thing.

There have been known cases of primary and secondary teachers who develop a disabling allergy to this type of font due to overexposure.

The fact is that this typography is so overused that it has become a symbol of simple-mindedness (not simplicity), and you do not want that in any way for a potential customer to associate it with your brand. It is almost suicidal. And it would leave you far from the adorable pathos that now floods social networks - if that was your intention.

Sincerely, as a designer I think there are much more interesting ways to give personality to a brand. Obviously this requires more knowledge and justification of the choices surrounding each visual element so that it can transmit exactly what is wanted without running the risk of being infantile or imprecise.

Of course, changing what is associated with the Comic Sans font would also represent a challenge that I would like to address. What values ​​or attributes of a brand could this typeface be related to? These thoughts are undoubtedly calling for more reflection.

Mijo! Brands and its team of experts will help you delineate your brand and drive it to success in the digital world. We are a leading creative digital marketing agency with presence in Mexico City, Guadalajara and Puerto Vallarta, and have experience with international brands.

Julián Lara is a graphic designer with Mijo! Brands. He studied at the University of Boyacá in Tunja, Colombia and is currently pursuing a specialization in Marketing Management. He calls himself an integral designer driven by a constant desire for learning and entrepreneurship of new challenges. A lover of travel, dance and studio photography, he devotes much of his free time to training disciplines such as kickboxing or insanity.